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Porthcurno in Cornwall, what to see and how to get there

Porthcurno in Cornwall

Today we go all the way to a place called Porthcurno in Cornwall which is located not far from Land’s End, and really you can not go much further west of here without having to swim. A  much recommended place,if you can make the long trip. From Land’s End and Penzance you can get here by walking along the path above the cliffs or  simply take the bus.

Photo: © Copyright Gordon McKinlay and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

porthcurno in CornwallOne reason why a small village like Porthcurno became famous was the fact that here  start (or end, depending on the point of view) e the telegraph wires that reach North America and India. The place was chosen because it was small and in an area with not many ships, which could cut the cables. These days you can visit the  telegraph museum  to find out more.

Photo: © Copyright Sarah Charlesworth and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

You should not think, however, that Porthcurno in Cornwall is of interest only to telecommunications enthusiasts,  the cliffs are considered to be  of exceptional natural area or beauty AONB. The beach and the cliffs of this area are considered among the 10 most beautiful bays in the world.

The beach is famous for its white sand, if you find the normal beach too boring, there is also another one called Green Bay beach that can only be reached at low tide. Another called Pedn Vounder, which exists only when the tide allows it, one of the few nudist beaches in Cornwall. The tides here are quite dramatic, so be careful.

About 30 minutes by road from Porthcurno to Treen, along a path that was once used for horses and mules, you will arrive at Logan Rock which is a huge mass of 80 tons that is in a precarious balanced position over the cliff.

in the past the rock could swing it with a little pressure, but in 1824 a group of British sailors brought the stone to the ground. Locals, angry because the Logan Rock was a tourist attraction even then, they made them put it back on its original place.  Unfortunately it has not swung since. 

If you are at Porthcurno in Cornwall  you must go to the very famous Minack Theatre , an outdoor theatre in a spectacular location. If you can not go look, at least look at this webcam. You can see how the weather changes quickly in these parts of the world, we are practically in the Atlantic Ocean.

How to get to Porthcurno in Cornwall

It is relatively straightforward to reach Porthcurno even by train or coach. You have to reach Plymouth first which is on the mainline to London. In Penzance there is another train that will take you to Land’s End. Here you can find a bus called Atlantic Coaster A1 which in about half an hour will take you to Porthcurno.

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Langley Wood; ancient oak forest not far from London

Langley Wood is not far from London, north of Southampton and  in the northern part of the New Forest. It  is an ancient oak forest.

Left to grow in its natural state is now home to a large amount of lichen  and five different types of deer who can roam and reproduce (including fallow and roe deer) and can easily go from this wood to the New Forest.

Langley Wood is home to a great variety of fauna and flora and is worth a visit at any time of year. In spring there is no shortage of beautiful butterflies and wildflowers.

Photo: © Copyright David Martin and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

In summer you will have the chance to meet several birds and autumn  offers all the beauty of the changing forest. Although the majority of the trees are oaks, you will also find several types of conifers, maples and walnuts. And even beech trees.

Among the birds that you can see find, there is the buzzard, sparrow hawk, warbler, redstart, wood warbler, woodcock and the famous woodpecker that if you are lucky you can hear before you even see it. The fact that the forest has been left to develop and grow naturally attracts many different types of birds. 

You can stroll along the Langley Wood  following one of the many trails that allow you to explore it to the fullest.

How to get to Langley Wood?

If you have your own transportation is also not difficult to get there from anywhere in England.

Langley Wood

If you have to rely on public transport the nearest train station is  Brockenhurst and from there you can take the Direct X70 bus to Salisbury just off after Landford Methodist Chapel and take bus 39 to Romsey and get off right after the first stop after the Cuckoo Inn. From here you have to get to the woodland walk is about 25 minutes of pleasant road.

Photo: © Copyright Stuart Logan and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.


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If you go to the New Forest, try to spend at least a few days, there is so much to see!

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Visit the Roman villa in Fishbourne

A few miles from Chichester in West Sussex you will find the largest Roman villa discovered in England. Easy to reach from Chichester city centre, just hop on the bus 700 outside the cathedral.

The inhabitants of the area were aware of the existence of an old house but the villa was formally excavated only in the 1960s.

It has a plan similar to that of the Domus Flavia in Rome, with a size actually comparable to Nero’s Domus Aurea. It seems that initially  lived a guy called Togidubnus, a local leader who was loyal to the Romans and therefore declared king of the region, this would at least explain the size of the house.

Photo Credit: © Copyright Penny Mayes and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The palace was then modernized in around 200 C.E. but was then almost completely destroyed in a fire.

However you can still see the beautiful mosaics, including the famous Cupid riding a dolphin.

The Roman villa is open to the public (here you can see the timetable) and once you have seen the villa, you can also visit the Roman style gardens and the museum.

 

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Trinity College Cambridge; what to see and how to visit it

trinity college cambridge

Trinity College Cambridge, one of the college founded by Henry VIII. Even now to enter it you have to pass by a Tudor-style gate of 1546, called the Great Gate.

Just look at the statues at the entrance, try to identify the one of King Henry VIII. Iff you look carefully  the king holds the leg of a table. It was not part of the original statue, as you can imagine,  but has been put by some student with a sense of humour and never removed.

Photo: © Copyright Marathon and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

When you reach the entrance of the Great Court (one of the places that visitors can visit) you’ll see a apple tree. This tree was planted in the ’50s and is said to be a direct descendant of the famous Isaac Newton’s apple tree. Yes, the gravity one.  Isaac Newton was still a student at this prestigious college at the time. The Great Court is magnificent and the largest in the world.

If you saw the movie ‘Chariots of Fire’ you will without doubt recognise the Trinity College  Cambridge Square, about 360 meters if you do the full tour. The race in the movie is still done, as the clock strikes the hour twice, you have to run around the Court in time between a touch and the other, which is usually about 44 seconds.

The fountain you see in the middle is 400 years old. From Great Gate you can get in Angel Court. Here  you are normally allowed to visit two rooms allocated to  first-year students.

The long history of Trinity College Cambridge

Nevile’s Court was built about 400 years ago, Lord Byron was here, although the bear is said he had with him when he was studying at Cambridge was not here. The huge library of Trinity College, Cambridge, who is called Wren Library has more than 55,000 old books.

It’s called Wren Library because it was built by  Christoper Wren, the rather famous architect of the Trinity College Cambridge Cathedral of St Paul’s and many other London churches.

Foto: © Copyright Paul Glazzard and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Now, with 700 students studying for a degree and 350 studying for a doctorate, the Trinity College Cambridge  is the largest college in Cambridge and Oxford. Among the many students that have passed from here we can find Francis Bacon, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Lord Byron, as many as 32 Nobel laureates and 6 British Prime Ministers.

How to get to Trinity College Cambridge?

Parts of the college are open to the public from 10 am to 16:30 during the week and the entrance fee is only £ 2. While Cambridge is an ideal one day trip from London and many areas in the south east, there is so much to see that you should spend at least a few days.



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trinity college cambridge

Trinity College Cambridge; what to see and how to visit it

Trinity College Cambridge, one of the college founded by Henry VIII. Even now to enter it you have to pass by a Tudor-style gate of 1546, called the Great Gate. Just look at the statues at the entrance, try to identify the one of King Henry VIII. Iff you look carefully  the king holds the […]

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St John’s College in Cambridge by Gordon Home

With its three successive courts and their beautiful gateways of mellowed red brick, St John’s College is very reminiscent of Hampton Court.  Both belong to the Tudor period, and both have undergone restorations and have buildings of stone added in a much later and entirely different style. Across the river stands the fourth court linked […]

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Barrington Court in Somerset; how to get there and what to see

All things Tudor have been fashionable lately and Barrington Court appeal to many. It apparently was built by Henry Daubeney, the last heir of this powerful medieval family.

Henry’s father was an advisor to King Henry VII and the young Henry spent his childhood at Hampton Court along with the future King Henry VIII. Later as an adult, Henry lost all his possessions, and died penniless. Barrington Court was later rescued nearly a century ago by the Lyle family, then it was used as a warehouse.

Photo: © Copyright Philip Halling and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The interesting thing about this house is that it does not contain any furniture and art objects and then you can visit  trying to imagine how it could have been

But you can not help but notice the panels and wooden paneling and strange symbols and almost hidden that are found around the house. You also can not miss the very colorful gardens, which with so many different plants, are a pleasure to visit in all months of the year.

barringtonThe house and gardens are managed by the National Trust , and if you are a member of this organisation (highly recommended if you love history and visit a lot of places) admission is free. In the winter months they are only open at weekends, so check the website before going to visit.

How to get to Barrington Court?

It is not easy to get there without their own transport and is certainly not a day trip from most parts of the country, but you can include it in a matter of days in the county of Somerset, the county offers many things to see. However, you can get to Taunton with a coach or a train and then take a local bus.

Photo: © Copyright Nick Chipchase and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

 


Other places to see in Somerset

Barrington Court in Somerset; how to get there and what to see

All things Tudor have been fashionable lately and Barrington Court appeal to many. It apparently was built by Henry Daubeney, the last heir of this powerful medieval family. Henry’s father was an advisor to King Henry VII and the young Henry spent his childhood at Hampton Court along with the future King Henry VIII. Later as an […]

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The impact of the Romans in Bath

This text on the Romans in Bath was written by Arthur Leslie Salmon in 1900. The book was called “Bath and Wells” is in the public domain and can be found here.  Bath can claim a high lineage, with much pomp and circumstance of event. It may even link itself with the fate of old […]

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