The castle of Carlisle is  in the city of the same name in Cumbria, not far from the Hadrian’s Wall, but does not date back to Roman times, in fact it is much more ongoing battles.

Foto:  © Copyright David Dixon and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Defeated the Scots once again, William II wanted a castle built where three rivers joined, King Henry I later reinforced the castle to protect the city of Carlisle.

For about 200 years the castle was targeted by Scottish armies, which were almost always defeated. For this reason at least until 1400 the castle was well kept and substantial sums of money bestowed to maintain and reinforce it.

castello di carlisleOnce the relationship between England and Scotland calmed down a bit, Carlisle’s castle lost importance (and investments), the only thing that was noticeable at the time was that Mary Stuart was imprisoned here for a short period.

Foto: © Copyright Christopher Hilton and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

With the English Civil War the castle of Carlisle returned to its moments of  glory, in fact it was besieged for months and months but then conquered, it also took part in the Jacobine rebellion in 1745. But all this marked the end of the castle’s war history.

Now in peace times,  you can visit Carlisle Castle which often has exhibitions and other events. You can also visit the tower where Mary Stuart was held prisoner by her cousin Elizabeth I.

In the castle there is also a museum dedicated to military life. The castle is now managed by English Heritage and you do not pay the entrance fee if you are a member of this organisation.

How to get to Carlisle Castle?

The castle is located in the centre of Carlisle which is well connected by train and bus with the rest of the country.

This is not a day trip from London, of course, but you can include a visit to the castle if you’re staying in Cumbria and the Lake District area.

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