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Trinity College Cambridge; what to see and how to visit it

trinity college cambridge

Trinity College Cambridge, one of the college founded by Henry VIII. Even now to enter it you have to pass by a Tudor-style gate of 1546, called the Great Gate.

Just look at the statues at the entrance, try to identify the one of King Henry VIII. Iff you look carefully  the king holds the leg of a table. It was not part of the original statue, as you can imagine,  but has been put by some student with a sense of humour and never removed.

Photo: © Copyright Marathon and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

When you reach the entrance of the Great Court (one of the places that visitors can visit) you’ll see a apple tree. This tree was planted in the ’50s and is said to be a direct descendant of the famous Isaac Newton’s apple tree. Yes, the gravity one.  Isaac Newton was still a student at this prestigious college at the time. The Great Court is magnificent and the largest in the world.

If you saw the movie ‘Chariots of Fire’ you will without doubt recognise the Trinity College  Cambridge Square, about 360 meters if you do the full tour. The race in the movie is still done, as the clock strikes the hour twice, you have to run around the Court in time between a touch and the other, which is usually about 44 seconds.

The fountain you see in the middle is 400 years old. From Great Gate you can get in Angel Court. Here  you are normally allowed to visit two rooms allocated to  first-year students.

The long history of Trinity College Cambridge

Nevile’s Court was built about 400 years ago, Lord Byron was here, although the bear is said he had with him when he was studying at Cambridge was not here. The huge library of Trinity College, Cambridge, who is called Wren Library has more than 55,000 old books.

It’s called Wren Library because it was built by  Christoper Wren, the rather famous architect of the Trinity College Cambridge Cathedral of St Paul’s and many other London churches.

Foto: © Copyright Paul Glazzard and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Now, with 700 students studying for a degree and 350 studying for a doctorate, the Trinity College Cambridge  is the largest college in Cambridge and Oxford. Among the many students that have passed from here we can find Francis Bacon, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Lord Byron, as many as 32 Nobel laureates and 6 British Prime Ministers.

How to get to Trinity College Cambridge?

Parts of the college are open to the public from 10 am to 16:30 during the week and the entrance fee is only £ 2. While Cambridge is an ideal one day trip from London and many areas in the south east, there is so much to see that you should spend at least a few days.



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Other places to visit

St John’s College in Cambridge by Gordon Home

With its three successive courts and their beautiful gateways of mellowed red brick, St John’s College is very reminiscent of Hampton Court.  Both belong to the Tudor period, and both have undergone restorations and have buildings of stone added in a much later and entirely different style. Across the river stands the fourth court linked […]

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trinity college cambridge

Trinity College Cambridge; what to see and how to visit it

Trinity College Cambridge, one of the college founded by Henry VIII. Even now to enter it you have to pass by a Tudor-style gate of 1546, called the Great Gate. Just look at the statues at the entrance, try to identify the one of King Henry VIII. Iff you look carefully  the king holds the […]

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Barrington Court in Somerset; how to get there and what to see

All things Tudor have been fashionable lately and Barrington Court appeal to many. It apparently was built by Henry Daubeney, the last heir of this powerful medieval family.

Henry’s father was an advisor to King Henry VII and the young Henry spent his childhood at Hampton Court along with the future King Henry VIII. Later as an adult, Henry lost all his possessions, and died penniless. Barrington Court was later rescued nearly a century ago by the Lyle family, then it was used as a warehouse.

Photo: © Copyright Philip Halling and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The interesting thing about this house is that it does not contain any furniture and art objects and then you can visit  trying to imagine how it could have been

But you can not help but notice the panels and wooden paneling and strange symbols and almost hidden that are found around the house. You also can not miss the very colorful gardens, which with so many different plants, are a pleasure to visit in all months of the year.

barringtonThe house and gardens are managed by the National Trust , and if you are a member of this organisation (highly recommended if you love history and visit a lot of places) admission is free. In the winter months they are only open at weekends, so check the website before going to visit.

How to get to Barrington Court?

It is not easy to get there without their own transport and is certainly not a day trip from most parts of the country, but you can include it in a matter of days in the county of Somerset, the county offers many things to see. However, you can get to Taunton with a coach or a train and then take a local bus.

Photo: © Copyright Nick Chipchase and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

 


Other places to see in Somerset

romans in bath

The impact of the Romans in Bath

This text on the Romans in Bath was written by Arthur Leslie Salmon in 1900. The book was called “Bath and Wells” is in the public domain and can be found here.  Bath can claim a high lineage, with much pomp and circumstance of event. It may even link itself with the fate of old […]

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Barrington Court in Somerset; how to get there and what to see

All things Tudor have been fashionable lately and Barrington Court appeal to many. It apparently was built by Henry Daubeney, the last heir of this powerful medieval family. Henry’s father was an advisor to King Henry VII and the young Henry spent his childhood at Hampton Court along with the future King Henry VIII. Later as an […]

0 comments
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Hever Castle – visit Anne Boleyn’s castle

anne boleyn's castle

Hever Castle is the famous Anne Boleyn’s castle. The castle is  only 45 km from London in Kent, and is therefore an idea for a day trip from the capital. The Tudors are now fashionable, thanks to the TV series and various books,  so you will not be the only one to visit it, especially if you go in the summer months.

Foto: © Copyright Malc McDonald and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

What can you find at Anne Boleyn’s castle?

Anne Boleyn lived in this castle when she was young and you will find objects belonging to her and a permanent exhibition about her life. In addition to this, the castle has a very long history and you can visit its many rooms with historical furniture.

To be honest, it was not exactly a castle but a fortified house. Purchased in 1462 by George Boleyn, who was Anna’s great-grandfather, and had been Lord Mayor of London. It was later inherited by Sir Thomas Boleyn, Earl of Wiltshire and father of Anna in 1505.

The count rebuilt most of the house and built the Long Gallery you see today. Here Anne and her sister Mary spent long periods of their childhood and this is where King Henry VIII courted Anne.

Count Thomas and his wife Elizabeth ( the latter was not very visible in life and after death,  in fact her body was not buried in the church of St Peter’s in Hever Castle along with her husband) had as many as 10 children.

Unfortunately none of the ten children was . Seven died as children and of the three remaining Anne, George and Mary the first two were beheaded. Mary, on the other hand, after having been the lover of several nobles and powerful, ended up in misery.

Inside the Anne Boleyn’s castle you can also visit an exhibition on torture instruments. You can rent one of the audio guides in English or other languages,  the tour will take you around 45 minutes.

hever castleThe gardens surrounding Hever Castle have won prizes and are definitely worth a visit, especially when it is not raining.

In the gardens there are also different types of birds, in addition to the usual ducks and wild geese.

Foto: © Copyright Dr Neil Clifton and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The pond is a recent project, having been completed in 1906. It still allows you to have a few excellent walks and even a boat ride. In summer there are many events and you can easily spend the entire day in the castle’s grounds. Check out the current events on the castle’s official website.

How to reach Hever Castle from London?

To be honest it is not easy to get to Anne Boleyn’s castle if you do not have your own car, but with a little planning,  it is still feasible.

You can take a train from Victoria Station and get off at Edenbridge Town, from here you have to take a taxi and it is a 5 kilometers ride, so it should not be too expensive.

Otherwise, get off at Hever (train to East Grinstead and change to Hurst Green, take the train to Uckfield) and walk a mile. Here you can find a map from the station to the castle.