Connect with us

Education

“Am I my brothers keeper?” “Jezebel” Biblical sayings in common use

Published

on

“Am I my brother’s keeper?” I ask myself.  Could I have prevented him from marrying Jezebel? “Eat, Drink and Be Merry” they said at the wedding reception, but I could already see the “writing on the wall” for the marriage.  My brother says that she is “the apple of my eye”. However, after only a few weeks of wedded bliss, she is already on the lookout for “forbidden fruit”.
 
My brother is “the salt of the earth” and I will always go “the extra mile” for him. How is he going to keep Jezebel “on the straight and narrow”?
My brother is now at his “wits end”, well on the way to a “broken heart”. I tell him to “be a man” and to “get to the root of the matter” 
“Can a leopard ever change her spots?” Whatever promises she makes to change her ways, they are just a “drop in a bucket” My brother is “turning to skin and bone”, with the stress of living with an unfaithful wife.  I tell him “Do not cast your pearls before swine” He has worked hard for his living and everything he has achieved comes from “the sweat of his brow”. We shall never see “eye to eye” on this. He would go to the “ends of the earth ” for Jezebel, whatever she does. I can only hope that he will come to his senses “at the eleventh hour”
 
Note: There is no evidence that the biblical Jezebel was a prostitute or even a loose woman. She was killed for her political activities and later vilified and her reputation trashed in these terms. 

In the nineteen sixties I worked in London stores. Worked as an Insurance Clerk in the City of London during the nineteen seventies. Divorced in the nineteen nineties. Now I am a retired Civil Servant, managing home and garden and escaping onto social media whenever possible.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Education

Do you know your Aphorisms from your Adages and from Proverbs?

Published

on

” Hoping for the best, prepared for the worst and unsurprised by anything in between ” Maya Angelou “I know why the caged bird sings” Autobiography. This is an example of a proverb, written in poetic language, offering advice. The Old Testament has a whole Book of Proverbs, giving instruction on how life should be lived.
 
An adage is a treasured observation, passed down in time and accepted as being true. It might, for example be handed down from a Buddhist text, or come from Adagia, a collection of Greek and Latin adages and proverbs. The observation that ” many hands make light work” is taken from Adagia.
An Aphorism is a direct definition of proper conduct. The word was first used by Hippocrates, the Father of Medicine, when writing his “Aphorisms of Hippocrates.”His first Aphorism  states that ” Life is short and Art is long, the crisis fleeting, experience perilous and decision difficult. The physician must not only be prepared to do what is right himself, but also to make the patient, the attendants and the externals cooperate “. These words hold true in medical practice today.
 
 
Other examples of aphorisms  are ” He who hesitates is lost”, ” “Actions speak louder than words”, ” Tis better to have loved and lost, than never loved at all” This last aphorism by Lord Tennyson, has become something of a “cliche”, which is an over used phrase that has lost its impact.
 
Further examples of adages  are “Eat to live, not live to eat” ” “Birds of a feather flock together” and “Early to bed, early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise ” There again it is possible to lapse into cliche, a danger with phrases in common use.

Continue Reading

Education

Is anything ever apropos, or has the word disappeared from general use?

Published

on

The saying first appeared in the English language in 1668, borrowed from the French word “apropos,” meaning literally “to the purpose”. Since then, it has been used as an adverb, adjective, noun and preposition. It is a very versatile word. The correct pronunciation is ap-ra-po.
 Sometimes it is used as a synonym for appropriate, but this is a deviation from its original meaning. Rarely it is used as a noun, when saying that which is referred to, has apropos – relevance ( noun) In French avoir de l’a propos.
 
” Apropos of Nothing”, the title of an autobiography by Woody Allen, is also an idiom, where the meaning is not deducible from the individual words. The action has no relevance to any previous discussion or situation – the opposite in fact to the usual meaning of apropos.
Used as a preposition, it leads on to further discussion of a subject of event, to which it refers. e.g ” apropos the proposed changes… ” As a preposition, apropos finds a place in formal letters. e.g ” apropos the receipt of the deed … ” Using it as an adjective, Charlotte Bronte wrote to her friend that ” Your letter coming is very apropos” If the wording of Charlotte’s letter had been ” Your letter arrived apropos” then Charlotte would have been using the word as an adverb.
 
If this is all Double Dutch to you, probably you will take the view that the word has indeed disappeared from general use. There is of course no reason not to use the word, either in spoken or written form, where it is relevant.
Bonne chance!

Continue Reading

Education

How was your day?

Published

on

How was your day? This has become my standard greeting, when opening an evening chat with a friend. Back comes the reply “the usual” This means that the day has been like the day before and probably the day before that.  Is that a bad thing? I suppose it depends on what “the usual” means for you. It could be a cause to celebrate. Another day has passed, with nothing to disturb the daily routine, and this brings with it some contentment. 
 
 If your usual day is grim, for whatever reason, the reply ” the usual ” will come with undertones of resignation,  meaning that you have faced and survived another day.  People for whom “the usual” means “pretty good” may have no conception of your usual, which to them would seem unbearable. 
 
No doubt there are a myriad of self-help books, with advice on “being positive” and on not “catastrophising” and it is true that if these books inspire fortitude , they can be of help.  Especially during the pandemic, there are people, who find themselves in desperate situations,  cut off from family and friends. Nevertheless, it is essential that they do seek help and if asked “How was your day?” they do not reply “the usual”.

Continue Reading

Recent Posts

Facebook

Trending

%d bloggers like this: