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Did you know there is a poison garden in England?

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This is not a joke, the Poison Garden really exists in Alnwick in Northumberland.  The Poison Garden is kept behind black iron gates, open only on guided tours. Visitors are strictly prohibited from smelling, touching or tasting any plant.

The gates have the image of a skull and the warning that these plants can kill. Inspired by the poisonous gardens found in Padua in 1500, the Duchess of Northumberland created this strange garden in 2005. When her husband unexpectedly became duke after the death of his older brother, the Duchess decided to transform a neglected part of the garden of Alnwick Castle in a poison garden.

In the garden you can find everything from Indian hemp to poppies, from poisonous mushrooms to plants that kill just by touching them. This plants are practically in a cage, although there is a ban on touching the plants, there is no risk in this strange garden. Some visitors may want to try touching the plants.

Worked in many sectors including recruitment and marketing. Lucky to have found a soulmate who was then taken far too soon. No intention of moving on and definitely not moving to Thailand for the foreseeable future. Might move forward. Owned by a cat.

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Architecture

The strange Egyptian house in Penzance in Cornwall

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In all parts of the world there are always weird things to see and Cornwall is certainly no exception. If you go to Penzance, try to pass by the strange Egyptian house. It was built on Chapel Street by Plymouth architect John Foulston around 1835. At this time everything Egyptian was in fashion. In London at Piccadilly they had built the Egyptian Hall at the same time and the province tried to adapt to trends.

Photo: Jhsteel / CC BY-SA

It was a Plymouth bookseller who wanted this house, his name was John Lavin and he had a passion for maps and travel guides but he also traded minerals. He had then bought two properties here, which were in fact two cottages but he wanted to stand out so he had the two buildings join together with a single facade.

In addition to transforming the architecture of the two buildings, he also built a small mineral museum inside. The house still exists now and houses three apartments, it is a listed building. The interesting thing is that it is a precursor of the Art Deco that conquered the world a century later.

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History

There is a real Roman temple in Windsor Park

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About 8 km south of Windsor Castle, still within the large park is Virginia Water, a very beautiful place famous for its lake and waterfall. However, not everyone knows that there is a Roman temple here. The lake is surrounded by a path leading east to Blacknest Gate, which extends along the water’s edge on the south side of the lake where there are several woods. About a mile east of the gate, the avenue leads into a grassy clearing overlooking the water, leading to the ruins of the Temple of Augustus brought from Leptis Magna to what would now be Libya in 1818, restored and erected by Sir Jeffry Wyatville 1824-6.

The temple was seen  by a guy called Warrington who heard that the Earl of Elgin had brought half the Parthenon to Britain, and thought of doing the same with this temple hoping to become a hero in his home country. He had problems with the locals, who wanted to keep the temple, not for artistic or historical interest, but to reuse the marble. So poor Warrington couldn’t get the whole temple. The temple is not only found here, In 1600 600 columns of Leptis were taken by Louis XIV for his palaces in Versailles and Paris.

In ancient times, the city of Leptis reached its greatest importance under the emperor Septimius Severus about 200 years after Christ. At that time it was the third most important city in Africa, after Carthage and Alexandria. The emperor had a new and magnificent forum built and enlarged the quays, as well as giving the city a huge basilica full of ornate carved columns. Thereafter, a dramatic decline began. A large tsunami in 365 devastated Leptis along with much of the Mediterranean coast. This was followed by the invasion of the Vandals in the fifth century and the arrival of Muslim armies in the seventh century which eventually left the city in ruins. Since its abandonment, Leptis had been used as a quarry by the local population and a place looted by the Europeans.

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Architecture

The London Underground as you’ve never seen it before

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His name is Luke Agbaimoni and he is a London photographer. For four years he has been photographing the London Underground and being a professional he shows it to us as we have never seen it before. While traveling on the tube, we rarely notice the symmetrical passages, historic architecture and new projects. There is truly beauty and poetry in what we have probably never looked at it properly.

For this reason he created a project called Tube Mapper which you can see on his website or on Instagram. On the website, the photos are divided into different categories, from animals on the Tube (where did he find that white cat waiting for the train?) to escalators and the symmetry of the subway.

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