Do you know what karaage is?

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The karaage is a very popular Japanese dish, a kind of chicken nuggets with a difference.

The word karaage not only identifies a dish but a way of cooking food, be it meat, fish or vegetables, by frying them without using the batter. T

Karaage is a Japanese word that identifies a dish made by cooking food, such as meat, fish or vegetables, in a restaurant. The name comes from Japanese words for “fried” and “rice”. The dish was originally made with leftover vegetables or bits of meat found on the kitchen floor.

This delicious recipe is cooked as a snack or as a main dish in Japan. You can find it being added to the various boxes of the lunch from school or from office called Bento.

While the world’s first chicken-fried steak was said to have been served in a small, two-story building in Wichita, Kansas in 1932, some say that the dish actually originated from a Tokyo restaurant called Mikasa Kaikan. The story goes that this particular restaurant served its own unique style of fried chicken with breaded and dipped into a coating of flour then egg and breadcrumbs.

The habit of frying foods, such as tempura, developed in Japan during the Edo period. The government encouraged the creation of intensive poultry farms to make up for the lack of food during the Second World War

The karaage use the tasty pulp of the boned thigh or thigh, while for the nuggets the chest. The meat is then marinated for 30 minutes in soy sauce and flavourings.

You can marinate it in garlic, ginger, curry, sesame oil or oyster sauce. At this point, the pieces are fried, sometimes twice. Finally, the karaage is served hot or cold usually with a slice lemon and Japanese mayonnaise.

There are many variations to this version some are dipped in different types of sauces. This would make the morsels lighter and crunchy. There is the zangi of Hokkaido, which is a meat dish that is wrapped in batter and served with an English-like flavour sauce Worcestershire.

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