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Health Masks Disposable 3 ply protective – non surgical

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It has become routine for me on leaving the house to put on a facemask. This makes it sound easy, which to most people it is, but I fiddle to tie a knot in the string on one side, to ensure a tighter fit. Once, I managed to cut the corner of my left eyelid, resulting in weeks of crusty discharge, but luckily no infection.
 
Things can only get better, I thought. Then I realised that I could no longer tolerate wearing my prescription sunglasses, while wearing a mask. According to my optician, the sun’s rays are more harmful to the eyes in winter,  than in summer, due to the altered position of the sun. I checked this out on google, and found that she is correct. Ah well, it’s not as if I spend hours outside anyway. 
 
My mask of choice is the disposable paper variety. There is a fast-dwindling supply of these around the house, purchased by my son who volunteered to send for them online, as I ceased in my efforts to make cloth ones. Handicrafts have never been my strong point and my finished products would have fitted very small dolls. 
 
In another attempt to be eco-friendly, I purchased a mask made of material from a chemist, but had to remove it due to skin irritation. There can be no doubt that paper masks are very convenient and hygienic. However, somewhere there must be a mountain of used masks, not recyclable and like disposable nappies polluting the environment? 
If you smile while wearing the mask, hopefully the smile will reach the eyes, which are the main means of communicating expression. There is also the opportunity to glare if the occasion arises! Sad to say one such occasion did arise when a bank clerk suggested I use the automated machine on the ground floor, for making bank transfers. I had climbed two flights of stairs specifically for counter service. I said that “I wouldn’t be doing that”, to which she replied that she “wasn’t really supposed to be doing transfers”.
 
This was quite funny due to the obvious lack of customers. I gestured to the empty counter and asked “what exactly do you do here?” ( the place is always quiet) On a second visit, I found myself glaring over the mask, but this time, there was no further difficulty.  Maybe someone in the meantime had pointed out that the use of the machine downstairs was not compulsory, or my glare was more effective than I thought. 
 
Finally, to the main point, it is really important to wear a mask. If everyone who can do so, wears one, it will help contain the spread of Covid via airborne droplets. Even if you doubt this, it is better to be safe than sorry and to be frank it’s all we have at the moment, together with the handwashing and the social distancing. Hopefully the vaccines will roll out in the near future and this terrible period of anxiety will decrease. 
In the meantime, take care and stay safe.

In the nineteen sixties I worked in London stores. Worked as an Insurance Clerk in the City of London during the nineteen seventies. Divorced in the nineteen nineties. Now I am a retired Civil Servant, managing home and garden and escaping onto social media whenever possible.

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Health

Robotic cats used in a retirement home in England

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A nursing home with dementia patients in Essex has used robotic cats to keep its residents calm and content. The result was so positive that an additional 200 robotic cats and 100 robotic dogs were purchased to provide support for people with dementia.

Battery-powered robotic cats purr, meow, and move when stroked and hugged. Dementia patients often become agitated, anxious and angry, and a pet usually helps them calm down. But I am not always able to manage a soul in flesh and blood.

Research has shown that an effective, drug-free way to soothe a patient with dementia is to give them a soft toy they can interact with. During this Covid-19 emergency, when people were unable to visit their relatives, robotic cats helped the 100 residents of the nursing home.

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Food

Health : Going Bananas about Bananas!

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I’m going bananas about bananas! The use of idioms would be perplexing to students of the English language, who could not deduce from the words used that I am very excited, or at least enthusiastic about bananas as a food. Who would not be when they realise that wrapped within a protective skin that mainly keeps out pesticides, even if not grown organically, there is both a perfect health and convenience food? 
While some people may not like their taste or texture, the banana is among the world’s most popular fruit.  It can satisfy a sweet tooth, while at the same time being low in calories. One medium sized banana has a hundred and five calories, containing fibre, minerals and antioxidants that are good for the digestion, kidney and heart function. 
 
 I remember a neighbour, whose daily regime after a coronary bypass operation, consisted of a long walk plus  – you’ve guessed it a banana!  The reason for this was that bananas are a great dietary source of potassium. One medium-sized banana (118 grams) contains 9% of the RDI.
A diet containing adequate levels of potassium can help lower blood pressure.  Bananas also contain magnesium, which is also important for heart health.
A single medium sized banana also contains Vitamin B6 33% of the RDI, Vitamin C 11% of the RDI, Copper 10% of the RDI and Manganese 14% of the RDI. Think how much these supplements are going to cost in the health shop and you will see what a good deal you are getting with a natural fruit! There are only 0.4 grams of fat in a banana, so it can also be considered a weight loss food.
 
Bananas should not cause major spikes in blood sugar levels as they contain pectin. However, people with type 2 diabetes should probably avoid eating a lot of very ripe bananas, as they monitor their sugar levels.  As in all circumstances people should take medical advice if concerned about their diet. 

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Herbal Medicine

Rosemary oil and memory; does it really help?

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Traditionally rosemary is said to be good for boosting memory, so many recommend smelling rosemary when studying.

In recent years the news has been circulating on the internet that even rosemary increases memory by 75% but can we really believe it?

Essential oils and plants have some benefits in many cases and when used judiciously but we should not blindly believe in all the potential miracle cures. For example, essential oils can be helpful and many use them to relieve the symptoms of chemotherapy, but we will never advise anyone to use essential oils or herbs to treat a malignant tumor or heart problem.

Let’s go back to memory… recently the snopes.com site, a site that has been trying to understand for years whether certain news is true or false, has tried to dispel the myth of rosemary and memory. The article is long  but in a nutshell it tells us that the news came from the newspaper The Daily Mail, not particularly famous for the accuracy of the scientific news it publishes.

The original article was about a study that proved that rosemary increases memory by 75%. The study was really done but it tried to prove if a particular chemical component of rosemary oil increased memory.

In any case, there is no evidence that it is rosemary oil, a chemical component of it or simply the fact that the aromas can remind us of things related to the smell itself. In short, we have no conclusive evidence that rosemary oil does not improve memory but certainly there is no evidence that it improves it and we can certainly discard the hypothesis that it increases it by 75%.

If you think that smelling rosemary oil helps you to study, go ahead and do it, but don’t take everything you read on the internet at face value. Often it isn’t true.

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