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Idioms of Mood – I’m Happy As Larry

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If I say, I’m as “Happy as Larry”, you may reasonably ask “Who is Larry?”, if you have not heard this phrase mentioned in conversation before.
Apparently, it refers to Larry Foley, 1847-1917, a middle weight Australian boxing champion, who was able to retire undefeated aged thirty-two, with a purse of £1000. Hence, he was described in these terms in the newspapers, as being very happy. 
 
I can also tell you that I’m “On Top of the World”, actually I’m “Over the Moon!!”  I was seen “Walking On Air” and being “On Cloud Nine”
Meteorologists classify clouds by numbers and cloud nine is pretty high up.  Naturally I am “Full of Beans” and enjoying these feelings of elation.
I can tell you that I am “tickled pink”, with the way things are going for me at the moment. (This is a phrase that retains its literal as well as its figurative meaning.) I am “Pleased as Punch”, the puppet unfortunately known for his domestic violence and “Happy as a Sandboy”. This phrase refers to Victorian workmen, whose cleaning job entailed visiting pubs, with consequent alcohol induced happiness.
 
If you ask me the reason for this happy mood, I can only put it down to being “Full of The Joys of Spring”

In the nineteen sixties I worked in London stores. Worked as an Insurance Clerk in the City of London during the nineteen seventies. Divorced in the nineteen nineties. Now I am a retired Civil Servant, managing home and garden and escaping onto social media whenever possible.

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Education

Do you know your Aphorisms from your Adages and from Proverbs?

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” Hoping for the best, prepared for the worst and unsurprised by anything in between ” Maya Angelou “I know why the caged bird sings” Autobiography. This is an example of a proverb, written in poetic language, offering advice. The Old Testament has a whole Book of Proverbs, giving instruction on how life should be lived.
 
An adage is a treasured observation, passed down in time and accepted as being true. It might, for example be handed down from a Buddhist text, or come from Adagia, a collection of Greek and Latin adages and proverbs. The observation that ” many hands make light work” is taken from Adagia.
An Aphorism is a direct definition of proper conduct. The word was first used by Hippocrates, the Father of Medicine, when writing his “Aphorisms of Hippocrates.”His first Aphorism  states that ” Life is short and Art is long, the crisis fleeting, experience perilous and decision difficult. The physician must not only be prepared to do what is right himself, but also to make the patient, the attendants and the externals cooperate “. These words hold true in medical practice today.
 
 
Other examples of aphorisms  are ” He who hesitates is lost”, ” “Actions speak louder than words”, ” Tis better to have loved and lost, than never loved at all” This last aphorism by Lord Tennyson, has become something of a “cliche”, which is an over used phrase that has lost its impact.
 
Further examples of adages  are “Eat to live, not live to eat” ” “Birds of a feather flock together” and “Early to bed, early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise ” There again it is possible to lapse into cliche, a danger with phrases in common use.

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Is anything ever apropos, or has the word disappeared from general use?

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The saying first appeared in the English language in 1668, borrowed from the French word “apropos,” meaning literally “to the purpose”. Since then, it has been used as an adverb, adjective, noun and preposition. It is a very versatile word. The correct pronunciation is ap-ra-po.
 Sometimes it is used as a synonym for appropriate, but this is a deviation from its original meaning. Rarely it is used as a noun, when saying that which is referred to, has apropos – relevance ( noun) In French avoir de l’a propos.
 
” Apropos of Nothing”, the title of an autobiography by Woody Allen, is also an idiom, where the meaning is not deducible from the individual words. The action has no relevance to any previous discussion or situation – the opposite in fact to the usual meaning of apropos.
Used as a preposition, it leads on to further discussion of a subject of event, to which it refers. e.g ” apropos the proposed changes… ” As a preposition, apropos finds a place in formal letters. e.g ” apropos the receipt of the deed … ” Using it as an adjective, Charlotte Bronte wrote to her friend that ” Your letter coming is very apropos” If the wording of Charlotte’s letter had been ” Your letter arrived apropos” then Charlotte would have been using the word as an adverb.
 
If this is all Double Dutch to you, probably you will take the view that the word has indeed disappeared from general use. There is of course no reason not to use the word, either in spoken or written form, where it is relevant.
Bonne chance!

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How was your day?

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How was your day? This has become my standard greeting, when opening an evening chat with a friend. Back comes the reply “the usual” This means that the day has been like the day before and probably the day before that.  Is that a bad thing? I suppose it depends on what “the usual” means for you. It could be a cause to celebrate. Another day has passed, with nothing to disturb the daily routine, and this brings with it some contentment. 
 
 If your usual day is grim, for whatever reason, the reply ” the usual ” will come with undertones of resignation,  meaning that you have faced and survived another day.  People for whom “the usual” means “pretty good” may have no conception of your usual, which to them would seem unbearable. 
 
No doubt there are a myriad of self-help books, with advice on “being positive” and on not “catastrophising” and it is true that if these books inspire fortitude , they can be of help.  Especially during the pandemic, there are people, who find themselves in desperate situations,  cut off from family and friends. Nevertheless, it is essential that they do seek help and if asked “How was your day?” they do not reply “the usual”.

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