Lundy Island

Lundy Island, what can you find there?

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Actually you won’t find much, but what is on Lundy Island is very interesting indeed, especially if you love birds.

If you want to get out of civilization for a couple of days you can do so by going to Lundy Island. Lundy is an island located in the Bristol Channel which can be reached in summer by ferry from Ilfracombe in North Devon and in the other months by helicopter.

The island is only18 km away. from the coast. On the island of Lundy you will barely be able to use your mobile phone, electricity is limited and there are no televisions and only 27 permanent inhabitants live there.

Most tourists take one of the five daily summer ferries and only stop for a couple of hours, only a minority stay overnight. In fact, the island also offers places to sleep even though they are all self catering, meaning you will have to cook yourself. 

Only 5 km long and 800 meters wide, Lundy has a very special atmosphere, it looks like Britain in miniature and you feel like you are traveling back in time.

Apart from the campsite there are only 23 places to sleep, so if you want to go there you will have to book in advance. However, some of these places are fascinating, in fact we have a lighthouse, a fisherman’s cottage and a small castle.

All accommodations belong to the Landmark Trust, which manages the island. There is only one place to eat which is also a pub and is called Marisco Tavern. If you want to cook, you can do your shopping in the only shop on the island, so don’t expect a great choice.

 

Although Lundy Island now has only a few inhabitants, it has actually been inhabited for at least 3,000 years and many came here from the Vikings to the Normans. In addition to history, the island offers a lot to those who want to walk and do not want to be in the midst of crowds. 

Lundy was once used as a granite quarry, was later granted to the Knights Templar by Henry II in 1160, and in the following centuries it became a pirate haunt. In fact, the ships had to sail near Lundy due to the sand banks of the River Severn estuary.

The area around the island is a marine reserve and an area of scientific interest. Here you can see seals and dolphins and towards the end of spring the island is filled with puffins with their young offspring. Other seabirds and birds of prey will definitely be there. Bring your binocular and camera with a good zoom.

How to get to Lundy Island?

The official website has all the information you need to go to Lundy. You must book everything in advance, including the crossing and keep in mind that this is a bit of an adventure; the sea is often rough and the crossings can undergo sudden changes. It is not unheard of to be stuck in Lundy Island for a day or more waiting for the weather to improve. 

Do you have the courage to go there?

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