Connect with us

Health

My dental history can be summed up in one word – Expensive!

Published

on

My dental history can be summed up in one word – Expensive! This is largely due to the cost of NHS treatment, and not to the dizzy heights of the cost of private dentistry.  My teeth have mainly sadly gone beyond the choice of fillings as an option, so it is a straight choice between crowns, bridges, or extractions. I have not yet progressed to dentures. (This can happen when the root of a tooth is too weak to support a crown, which can happen with advanced age. My neighbour aged eighty-nine years old found herself in this position, with regard to a lower front tooth. She was presented with a single denture , which had to be removed at night. She found this too tight and difficult to handle and the tooth is now left unworn in a drawer. So that was £269.30 down the dental plughole ). 
 
Back to me – about fifteen years ago, local dentists, within walking distance of my home, decided to leave the NHS altogether, so this necessitated my travel to a dentist, which became an added cost. The removal of my name from an NHS list for this reason, happened twice. The second dentist did say that I could stay on as a private patient, at the rate of £200 per hour.  This would include the cost of all materials used for making crowns etc. He figured that the amount of work I had done would make it a good deal for me!  I declined. After some feverish searching through Yellow Pages, I managed to get accepted as an NHS patient at a Health Centre, which I have attended ever since. 
 
My early painful experiences with dentists started in childhood, when the pain was not financial. On one occasion I’m sorry to say (not sorry) I bit my dentist! “If you hurt me, I’ll hurt you” I remember saying to him, which at the time seemed reasonable. He did not take it well, rushing off to wash the wound, which was bleeding, as if I had been a rabid dog. I wonder if tetanus injections were available in the nineteen fifties, because if they were, I’m sure he would have arranged to get one.  I don’t know if it was general practise at that time, but my dentist seemed set on cramming my small mouth, with the contents of his dental tray, including a rubber bung to keep my jaws open! These days I’m relieved to say, that dentists trust their patients to keep their mouths open during treatment, without the use of forcible devices. 
Happily, my relationships with dentists improved over time, with no further incidents of assault.  Just as well, as the amount of drilling on my teeth, has been on an industrial scale. I have learnt to relax for long sessions in the dental chair and have no fear of needles, required for injections. However, I would advise you to remind your dentist to use numbing spray before injecting the gums over front teeth, or your eyes will water!
 
My current dentist makes a point of showing me the X rays on my teeth requiring treatment, without which I would have no idea what he is forced to put up with.  On one particularly gruesome occasion I found myself saying “I’m so sorry”, but I guess he is used to the sight of dental decay. I wonder if a dentist sees patients , primarily as walking jawbones,  mentally evaluating them according to their usual treatment bands?
On one occasion I swallowed a temporary crown in place on a back tooth. It was made of a soft material, which slipped down my throat, before I could stop it.  I retrieved a small portion to show to my dentist, who said somewhat reproachfully “You swallowed it”  Despite this little hiccup, things have gone smoothly ever since.
 
Here is what you can expect to be charged if you visit an NHS dentist after 1 July 2019. These are guidelines only and charges are periodically adjusted.
 
 
In England
 
Band 1: £22.70 Covers an examination, diagnosis and advice. If necessary, it also includes X rays, a scale and polish and planning for further treatment
 
Band 2: £62.10 Covers all treatment included in Band 1, plus additional treatment, such as fillings, root canal treatment and removing teeth   (extractions)
 
Band 3: £269.30 Covers all treatment included in Bands 1 and 2, plus more complex procedures, such as crowns, dentures and bridges
 
These are the charges in England.
 
 In Wales, charges are quite a bit less.  Band 1 charge is £14:30. Band 2 charge is £46. Band 3 charge is £199.10 

In the nineteen sixties I worked in London stores. Worked as an Insurance Clerk in the City of London during the nineteen seventies. Divorced in the nineteen nineties. Now I am a retired Civil Servant, managing home and garden and escaping onto social media whenever possible.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Health

Robotic cats used in a retirement home in England

Published

on

A nursing home with dementia patients in Essex has used robotic cats to keep its residents calm and content. The result was so positive that an additional 200 robotic cats and 100 robotic dogs were purchased to provide support for people with dementia.

Battery-powered robotic cats purr, meow, and move when stroked and hugged. Dementia patients often become agitated, anxious and angry, and a pet usually helps them calm down. But I am not always able to manage a soul in flesh and blood.

Research has shown that an effective, drug-free way to soothe a patient with dementia is to give them a soft toy they can interact with. During this Covid-19 emergency, when people were unable to visit their relatives, robotic cats helped the 100 residents of the nursing home.

Continue Reading

Food

Health : Going Bananas about Bananas!

Published

on

I’m going bananas about bananas! The use of idioms would be perplexing to students of the English language, who could not deduce from the words used that I am very excited, or at least enthusiastic about bananas as a food. Who would not be when they realise that wrapped within a protective skin that mainly keeps out pesticides, even if not grown organically, there is both a perfect health and convenience food? 
While some people may not like their taste or texture, the banana is among the world’s most popular fruit.  It can satisfy a sweet tooth, while at the same time being low in calories. One medium sized banana has a hundred and five calories, containing fibre, minerals and antioxidants that are good for the digestion, kidney and heart function. 
 
 I remember a neighbour, whose daily regime after a coronary bypass operation, consisted of a long walk plus  – you’ve guessed it a banana!  The reason for this was that bananas are a great dietary source of potassium. One medium-sized banana (118 grams) contains 9% of the RDI.
A diet containing adequate levels of potassium can help lower blood pressure.  Bananas also contain magnesium, which is also important for heart health.
A single medium sized banana also contains Vitamin B6 33% of the RDI, Vitamin C 11% of the RDI, Copper 10% of the RDI and Manganese 14% of the RDI. Think how much these supplements are going to cost in the health shop and you will see what a good deal you are getting with a natural fruit! There are only 0.4 grams of fat in a banana, so it can also be considered a weight loss food.
 
Bananas should not cause major spikes in blood sugar levels as they contain pectin. However, people with type 2 diabetes should probably avoid eating a lot of very ripe bananas, as they monitor their sugar levels.  As in all circumstances people should take medical advice if concerned about their diet. 

Continue Reading

Herbal Medicine

Rosemary oil and memory; does it really help?

Published

on

Traditionally rosemary is said to be good for boosting memory, so many recommend smelling rosemary when studying.

In recent years the news has been circulating on the internet that even rosemary increases memory by 75% but can we really believe it?

Essential oils and plants have some benefits in many cases and when used judiciously but we should not blindly believe in all the potential miracle cures. For example, essential oils can be helpful and many use them to relieve the symptoms of chemotherapy, but we will never advise anyone to use essential oils or herbs to treat a malignant tumor or heart problem.

Let’s go back to memory… recently the snopes.com site, a site that has been trying to understand for years whether certain news is true or false, has tried to dispel the myth of rosemary and memory. The article is long  but in a nutshell it tells us that the news came from the newspaper The Daily Mail, not particularly famous for the accuracy of the scientific news it publishes.

The original article was about a study that proved that rosemary increases memory by 75%. The study was really done but it tried to prove if a particular chemical component of rosemary oil increased memory.

In any case, there is no evidence that it is rosemary oil, a chemical component of it or simply the fact that the aromas can remind us of things related to the smell itself. In short, we have no conclusive evidence that rosemary oil does not improve memory but certainly there is no evidence that it improves it and we can certainly discard the hypothesis that it increases it by 75%.

If you think that smelling rosemary oil helps you to study, go ahead and do it, but don’t take everything you read on the internet at face value. Often it isn’t true.

Continue Reading

Recent Posts

Concerts coming up!

Facebook

Trending